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Kampala City

Uganda Travel / Kampala City

Kampala City, generally known as the city of seven hills, is the capital city of Uganda, center of commercial life and the seat of government including the Parliament and historical monuments. The City alone offers cultural lovers lots of opportunities to appreciate the country’s cultural diversity. Kampala city tour will give you the opportunity to traverse the major landmarks in this humble city to experience the historical monuments that have shaped the destiny of this great nation. The tour gives you an understanding of the Kampala City folk lifestyle, the unique behaviors of Ugandan people, the culture, the traditions and history.
Kampala City Tour Highlights The earliest civilizations of the Buganda Kingdom The Kasubi tombs The Bahai Temple The National Museum The Uganda Martyrs Shrine Cultural entertainment Tour Itinerary We start off with a visit to the Buganda Kingdom. Uganda’s Monarchies present a rich cultural heritage that Uganda proudly boasts over other safari destinations in Africa and move to the Kasubi tombs where Buganda’s Kings are burried. From here we shall proceed to Martyrs Shrines at Namugongo, a historical site where 22 Martyrs were set ablaze on the orders of a Buganda King for refusal to renounce Christianity. The Kampala city tour concludes with a visit to the Uganda National Museum to see ethnological and natural-historical exhibitions that represent the country colourful past. And if it’s a Friday, Saturday or Sunday you have the opportunity in the evening to experience a unique cultural entertainment of the main cultures of Uganda at the famous Ndere Cultural Centre.
Kampala is the capital and largest city of Uganda. The city is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Rubaga Division. Surrounding Kampala is the rapidly growing Wakiso District, whose population more than doubled between 2002 and 2014 and now stands at over 2 million.

Kampala was named the 13th fastest growing city on the planet, with an annual population growth rate of 4.03 percent, by City Mayors. Kampala has been ranked the best city to live in East Africa ahead of Nairobi and Kigali by Mercer, a global development consulting agency based in New York City.

Before the arrival of the British colonists, the Kabaka of Buganda had chosen the zone that would become Kampala as a hunting reserve. The area, composed of rolling hills with grassy wetlands in the valleys, was home to several species of antelope, particularly impala. When the British arrived, they called it “Hills of the Impala”. The language of the Baganda, Luganda, adopted many English words because of their interactions with the British. The Baganda translated “Hill of the Impala” as Akasozi ke’Empala – “Kasozi” meaning “hill”, “ke” meaning “of”, and “empala” the plural of “impala”. In Luganda, the words “ka’mpala” mean “that is of the impala”, in reference to a hill, and the single word “Kampala” was adopted as the name for the city that grew out of the Kabaka’s hills.

The city grew as the capital of the Buganda kingdom, from which several buildings survive, including the Kasubi Tombs (built in 1881), the Lubiri Palace, the Buganda Parliament and the Buganda Court of Justice. In 1890, British colonial administrator Frederick Lugard constructed a forum along Mengo Hill within the city, which allowed for the British to occupy much of the territory controlled by the Baganda, including Kampala. In 1894, the British government officially established a protectorate within this territory, and in 1896, the protectorate expanded to cover the Ankole, Toro Kingdom, and Bunyoro kingdoms as well. In 1905, the British government formally declared the entire territory to be a British colony. From that time until the independence of the country in 1962, the capital was relocated to Entebbe, although the city continued to be the primary economic and manufacturing location for Uganda. In 1922, the Makerere Technical Institute, now known as Makerere University, started as the first collegiate institution both within Kampala, and within the British colonies on the east coast of Africa. Following the 1962 independence, Milton Obotebecame president of Uganda, and held the position until 1971, when former sergeant Idi Amin defeated his government in a military coup.Idi Amin proceeded to expel all Asian residents living within Kampala, and attacked the Jewish population living within the city. In 1978, he invaded the neighboring country of Tanzania, and in turn, the government there started the Uganda–Tanzania War, which created severe damage to the buildings of Kampala. The city has since then been rebuilt with new construction of hotels, banks, shopping malls, educational institutions, and hospitals and the improvement of war torn buildings and infrastructure. Traditionally, Kampala was a city of seven hills, but over time it has come to have a lot more.

Kampala has a tropical rainforest climate (Af) under the Köppen-Geiger climate classification system.

A facet of Kampala’s weather is that it features two annual wetter seasons. While the city does not have a true dry season month, it experiences heavier precipitation from August to December and from February to June. However, it’s between February and June that Kampala sees substantially heavier rainfall per month, with April typically seeing the heaviest amount of precipitation at an average of around 169 millimetres (6.7 in) of rain. Kampala has been frequently mentioned as a lightning-strike capital of the world.

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